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InBloom

Disclosed Personal Data Education

The Data

Initiated in 2011 through $100 million in seed money from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, InBloom aimed to store, clean and aggregate student data for states and districts.

How the data was shared

InBloom was a nonprofit student data repository that made available standardized student and school data for creating approved third party applications and software designed for educators. It collected information from school districts' many databases, and stored these in the cloud, protected with high-level encryption. The inBloom database included more than 400 different data fields about students that school administrators could fill in. But, since some of the details seemed personal, like family relationships and enrollment changes, some parents objected, saying that they did not want that kind of information about their children transferred to a third-party vendor. InBloom ultimately collapsed, for a variety of reason, but mainly because the data sharing agreements were seen as a dangerous encrouchment into students' education. [A 2017 article](https://points.datasociety.net/inblooms-collapse-undermined-personalized-learning-and-data-standards-efforts-199c5cccac01#.a69staljc), drawn from a [detailed report about inBloom](https://datasociety.net/pubs/ecl/InBloom_feb_2017.pdf), suggested that "For many on the ground, inBloom was nothing more than another example of rich tech elites projecting their values onto their communities with no contextual understanding.

Purpose of Data Shared

Initiated in 2011 with $100 million in seed money from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, InBloom aimed to store, clean and aggregate student data for states and districts, making data available and standardized for approved third party applications and software designed for educators. Backlash came from increased privacy concerns from parents and educators over the collection, use and storage of personally identifiable information on students, causing many partners to back out of initial agreements. InBloom began ending its services in April 2014.

Region: North America

includes kosovo